Tag Archives: vintage-inspired

M7053 ~ bat-wing it is!

folds circles in red a click takes you to the pattern
folds circled in red
a click takes you to the pattern

A quick note to report Linda was correct in her comment,

“it looks like two different bodices – one straight and one bat-wing with sleeves incorporated in the bodice piece. Then you add a straight long sleeve onto the one. And a puffy sleeve end onto the bat-wing bodice.”

Turns out I wasn’t paying enough attention to those ickle fold lines on their drawing.

And now I have the pattern.   🙂

quick (pattern) question?

McCall's 7053 click to go to pattern
McCall’s 7053
click to go to pattern
McCall's 7053 click to go to pattern
McCall’s 7053
click to go to pattern

Has anybody made up any of the McCall’s Archive Collection patterns? Specifically, the blouse (M7053)??

What I cannot for the life of me figure out is how those two ~ two  ~ different sleeve silhouettes can come from what look to be same-shape pattern pieces.

M7053, from McCall's Archive Collection
M7053, from
McCall’s Archive Collection
click to go to pattern page

Any guesses?  My thanks to Laura at Lilacs & Lace for mentioning McCall’s latest 1930’s dresses on her blog – they’re stunners.

the butler’s guide

my library's copy but might need to have me own
my library’s copy
but might need to have me own
(click to go to amazon.com listing)

 

The weather’s turning cooler, so I’ve been busy getting out and sorting through last autumn’s clothes.  And considering what’s still needed, what’s in stash… You know how it goes.  Time-consuming, but in a nice way.  🙂

There’s some lovely washable rayon and wool jerseys in there, but there’s also at least 1 piece of woven wool.  And I don’t know if it should be washed…

I was trying to remember what former butler, now author Stanley Agar, wrote about caring for wools in the book he co-wrote (above), but had to get it out of the library to review.  Am glad I did, as there’s plenty of detail I’d forgotten.

He stresses airing out clothes before putting them away, and brushing down coats, suits, and jackets.  He details what kind of brushes to use on each type of fabric, and how to brush so fibres aren’t damaged.

Agar also stresses getting rid of dust.  Which leaves me feeling guilty for leaving fabrics out on the sewing table far too long, but doesn’t stop my habit.  Other things he recommends for fabrics include ~

Clothing Care and Packing

  • “Dust is abrasive” and in time will wear on cloth (and stash has plenty of time, doesn’t it!)
  • There used to be special brushing rooms
  • Velvet – rub gently with nap; steam in a hot shower to “liven up”
  • Tweed (wool) – can take “especially strong treatment”; brush up and down with a regular clothes brush
  • Suits – dust doesn’t adhere closely to synthetics; wool or tweed suits should be brushed every time they’re worn

Although I didn’t find exactly what I was looking for, I thought there was useful information.  Clearly Downton Abbey leaves this level of detail alone!

weekly photo challenge: endurance

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Gotta admit this flummoxed me.

Then linen floated into my head, then wool, and I thought about clothing, designs, the why of sewing.

How quickly did it become more than something just to stay warm?  How was weaving cloth discovered, and by whom?

Thinking about endurance and sewing can take one all sorts of place, from bone needles and mummies to toxic chemicals, clean water, and how high is too high for a platform shoe.

ENDU”RANCE, n. [See Endure.  v.i. … [F. endurer; pref. en– (L. in) + durer to last…]] Continuance; a state of lasting or duration; lastingness.

 

Original WordPress post is here.

 

from the weekend . . .

Click a pic to begin slide show

Did a bit of sewing, but not too much.  Hit a bit of a puzzle:  How to use the crochet bits from these two ancient pillowcases?

Do note the scalloped edge and how thoroughly it’s sewn into place… would love not to have to un-pick that.

Suggestions?

weekly photo challenge: silhouette

Sil`hou*ette“, n. [F.; — so called from Etienne de Silhoutte, a French minister of finance in 1759, whose diversion it was to make such portraits on the walls of his apartments.] A representation of the outlines of an object filled in with a black color…

Interesting definition from the 1913 dictionary, isn’t it?  How to illustrate this in sewing… flummoxing! . . . but let me lure you into the mind of a sewer  .   .   .   .   .

 

 

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Sewers are obsessed, generally, with detail, and we can see that detail much better in an outline format, as shown in these 2 examples.  I positioned the colour examples at the end of each set so you might get used to the somewhat lack of detail in the black & white versions, and then be properly surprised when you view the colour.

Were you?!

I know these aren’t proper silhouettes, but we just don’t deal very much with them in sewing.  Oh!  Light bulb moment: If you’re thinking . . .   these are from Emma One Sock & you can click the piccie to go directly to the fabric on her site.

scuba_35149-02b_stamp

 

 

 

silkcharmeuse_SUNO55_stampknit_35496-01_stamp

Original WordPress post is here.

Other photos over here…

more details!

Click any photo to go to full screen slide view, then either click or Escape to return to the page

As yesterday, you should find the following ~

  • Fabric draped over sewing machine
  • Fabric draped over sewing machine with light behind, to show sheerness
  • Fabric draped over sewing machine with ruler, to show scale
  • Fabric pegged out, to really show scale
  • If there’s a 5th photo, it’s a pattern I’m either considering, or will def use

Enjoy, everyone &  Happy Sewing!

 

Remember to click any photo to go to full screen slide view, then either click or Escape to return to the page

details!

Remember, you can click any photo to go to full screen slide view, then either click or Escape to return to the page

Whilst starting this current round of fabric pre-wash, I thought to do a few photos along the way, to illustrate these fine fabrics a bit better. You should see the following for each new fabric:

  • Fabric draped over sewing machine
  • Fabric draped over sewing machine with light behind, to show sheerness
  • Fabric draped over sewing machine with ruler, to show scale
  • Fabric pegged out, to really show scale
  • If there’s a 5th photo, it’s a pattern I’m either considering, or will def use

Enjoy, everyone &  Happy Sewing!

july/august ~ calm before storm

my latest bookshelf bookfrabjus eye candy!!!
my latest bookshelf book
frabjus eye candy!!!

I’ve been having great fun reading.

Ever had a week when you just didn’t want to face WordPress writing?  I did, but curiously it didn’t stop me from putting this together.

Recently purchased a Kindle app version of Elizabeth Hawes’ Fashion is Spinach, and it’s keeping me eyeballs glued to the screen.  That means a lot of interest, as I don’t like to read books on screens.

But that was the most economical way to ease the niggling thoughts created whilst reading snippets from Lizzie’s The Vintage Traveler blog that made the book sound sooo interesting. (Thank you, Lizzie!)  See here, here, and here!

Hawes’ writing is as up-to-date as tomorrow’s internet posts. However, she misses the point about home sewers.  At that time many/most women sewed, or knew someone that did!  (Remember my fav Mary Brooks Picken?)

Currently almost half way through “Spinach,” getting to the part where Hawes is about to leave Paris and go back to New York City.  If you’re at all interested in fashion versus style, or Paris fashion houses in the 20’s, this is a great book to start with.  Hawes was an excellent writer!

  • “Fashion is a parasite on style”
  • “Style in 1937 may give you a functional house and comfortable clothes… Style doesn’t give a whoop whether your comfortable clothes are red or yellow or blue… Style gives you shorts for tennis because they are practical…”

That’s what I’ve been realizing this summer, whilst contemplating my nearly-empty closet, my fabric stash, and pattern collection.  Have said it before: heat & humidity are my least favourite things, and it’s always been tough for me to decide what to wear.  Wouldn’t matter if I didn’t sew (gasp!) and just bought – horrors of a different sort!

The other book I’m also reading on-screen is a free download of a dissertation on American sports clothing’s evolution, When the Girls Came Out to Play, by Patricia Campbell Warner.  Boring?  NEH-vah!!!  Here’s another excellent writer who’s dug up plenty of tidbits from history and managed to weave everything together in a quite readable style. Again, I thank Lizzie for the information on her post here.

Feminists shouldn’t be put off by either book, as they are compatible.  When the Girls is both the history of the women’s movement in the United States and the ramifications on their attire whilst becoming more athletic (equated with a more healthy lifestyle).  Typical for a thesis, Warner includes lots of footnotes for further research.

In Spinach, published in 1937, Hawes was writing about what she did in the fashion industry in Paris and New York, as an emancipated woman in the 1920’s and 30’s.

paul poiret, mantle. yellow wool with black chiffon lining. french, c. 1913. might be my fav from Lussier’s book
paul poiret, mantle. yellow wool with black chiffon lining. french, c. 1913.
might be my fav from Lussier’s book

Then I bought the icing on the cake, so to speak:  Art Deco Fashion, by Suzanne Lussier.  A beautifully illustrated and way-too-small sampling of fashions in the late 20’s – early 30‘s, my favourite era.  Again, after much soul-searching and scouring local libraries I decided to purchase a good used copy. (I think Lizzie had also written about it, but a search with “Lussier” didn’t yield a match, so you’ll have to take my word for it!)

The photo I’ve made and included here illustrates to me that Orientalism was influencing fashion much earlier than I’d originally thought.  No wonder there were so many kimonos being worn in that British mini-series, The House of Eliott. I think Lizzie had written about it, but a search with “Lussier” didn’t come up with anything.  So you’ll have to take my word for it!

All-in-all, July’s final week wasn’t quite empty of fashion, despite my not posting loads of finished garments.

Am now thinking about it as the calm before the storm.  More on that anon.  🙂