Tag Archives: skirts

a bit of a mix

Enjoying your weekend?! I’m spending it crocheting because my squidgy package arrived Saturday. Yeah!

I’ve also been reviving my listing on Ravelry, so stop by at CurlsnSkirls and say hello if you’re a member. Long ago Chicago efforts are listed, but I’m working on getting things updated.

Valentine’s Day is Thursday and the appropriate cotton cloth (top) is gracing a bedside table. When my voice studio was open I made seasonal table toppers (any excuse to buy fabric) and I still enjoy seeing them each year.

Curvy Sewing Collective had two great posts this week. Both inclusive sizing and inclusive language are extremely important, so do take a look.

And speaking of inclusive sizing, Grainline Studios (Chicago) is increasing their size range and has a questionnaire open to anyone who would like to make suggestions.

For anyone looking for podcasts about sewing, you cannot beat Love to Sew (Canadian) and The Fold Line (London).

Here’s that finished skirt topped with a gorgeous suede jacket from a closing consignment store in Chicago. (Yes, the skirt’s been that long in the making.) Anyone have suggestions for how to clean the suede without going to a cleaner who will charge multiple times my original cost and use icky chemicals?

Here’s one last suggestion for those of us struggling to get better at, or just get back into sewing – Lucie wrote a great post last week about her own experience. Much food for thought!

Meanwhile, hope everyone can hunker down and get to creating something. Creativity is positive! There’s nothing better for overcoming negatives.

❤️ ❤️ ❤️ ❤️ ❤️ ❤️ ❤️ ❤️ ❤️ ❤️ ❤️ ❤️ ❤️ ❤️ ❤️

Advertisements

must be past my nap time…

rayon from stash

This morning I logged into WordPress to see what the sewing world was up to and was greeted by a big announcement of Gutenberg.

I thought it referred to the large, free, public domain book site, gutenberg.org, and wondered what the heck was going on.

Mid-afternoon I had a bit of time and decided to explore. Being careful not to click the Download button, I opted for more info.

And promptly thought I’d dropped down the rabbit hole.

Starting here I had trouble making it through the first paragraph:

“The editor will endeavour to create a new page and post building experience that makes writing rich posts effortless, and has “blocks” to make it easy what today might take shortcodes, custom HTML, or “mystery meat” embed discovery.”

Rightly guessing my clueless and bug-eyed response, the text immediately set about explaining:

“Key take-aways from parsing that paragraph:

  • “Authoring richly laid out posts is a key strength of WordPress.

  • “By embracing “the block”, we can potentially unify multiple different interfaces into one. Instead of learning how to write shortcodes, custom HTML, or paste URLs to embed, you should do with just learning the block, and all the pieces should fall in place.

  • “Mystery meat” refers to hidden features in software, features that you have to discover. WordPress already supports a large number of blocks and 30+ embeds, so let’s surface them.”

Maybe I am more sleep deprived than I thought. This doesn’t make sense. Can any of you Lovely Readers help?

Meanwhile, on a more pleasant note, am debating about cutting up my last piece of the above buttery soft rayon.

Already have a top and cut-offs, but could also use a skirt.

Nothing fancy, just slip in an elastic waist and zip up the sides. Maybe a pocket, if the bits on the jagged edges are large enough.

Sitting over on the corner is another rayon remnant. This navy might be enough for shorts, but I think the fabric’s print might look better as a skirt.

Do prints ever do that to you?  Sort of give you a Look, as if  peering down their nose and saying, “I am not that sort of fabric.”

The inspiration piece for these skirts is another rayon skirt.  All three fabrics were from Vogue whilst living in Chicago. They’ve been ageing in stash – goodness! – more than six years.

Hope this isn’t a “best-laid plans” sort of post, and I can actually motivate myself into picking up the scissors.

Watch this space…

this ‘n that

Have been trying to finish up a batch huge pile of UFOs (unfinished objects) which includes things cut out but not sewn.

Have had some success, and was wear-testing the last one today. Not that the pile is gone, mind you.

Click a pic below so you can read the texts. And onward to the next one . . .

lessons learnt

Vogue 8750
click to go to pattern

Okay. Let’s look at this one last time, shall we?

Remember this, this, and more recently the petersham post here?

After several years of working (mostly not working) on this, I still think it’s a good pattern.

Just not in the fabric I chose. And there’s a huge learning curve in that “NOT.”

As I got into the pattern, which has some weird pieces that prove interesting for fit, I discovered that precise seam widths were vital. (ugh!) A fraction off in some places and it’s seam ripper time.

see any top stitching?
thought not.

But even more important was the concept of those side pieces. Definitely bias effect going on, which should affect what fabric gets used, and its pattern.

Blithely ignorant, I lost a lot of the skirt’s character, as all the interesting top stitched detail  became invisible on this patterned fabric.

Although I thought the weight of the cotton would be good (it’s okay), it turned out the ravelling has been horrendous. Something I didn’t discover until I’d washed it a few times, which I did over the past 2 years.

see all the straggling ends? don’t believe that using pinking shears on a cotton will handle any ravelling… just sayin’

But lest we get discouraged, there have been positives: Learning about petersham ribbon from Hila’s post and actually using it for a waistband has been a huge plus. (Suspect it will influence most future skirts.)

The other huge plus has been realising, then acknowledging my mistake in using fabric I do not like. (An early on-line purchase so I didn’t touch it beforehand.)

HUGE lesson learnt: Don’t even think about using up fabrics you don’t want to touch… even for a toile.

Below are assorted photos from the recent finishing. However, if you’re looking for sassy photos of me wearing this . . . 😱   Shock! Horror!

Do you ever see sassy piccies of me??  Lol!   Will admit to laundering it again, giving it a good press, and trying it on. It fits loosely, as I made a straight 16 I think, and am not about to alter it.

The petersham waist works really well for me (hate waistbands) as it sits at the waist (or would if I fitted it properly) and doesn’t annoy. Because of the weird side pieces there’s a good fit at the hip, particularly when seated.

Would I make it again? “Never say never.”  Maybe. . . . but with better fabric.

😊  Have a grand weekend, Lovelies!

an odd assortment

at least/at last got this scarf hemmed & washed

With all that’s going on in the world, I sometimes wonder. . .

Am I the only one feeling slightly … um… er… dis………engaged?

Nevertheless, managed to get the cutting table cleared off. Mostly. Which, as we all know, is not a minor feat.

Hila at Saturday Night Stitch had a great post about the difference between Petersham and grosgrain ribbon.

It reminded me of a skirt that’s been hanging for a couple of years awaiting it’s grosgrain ribbon waist band, which I’d managed to locate last year. So what’s been the hold up?

Was it sheer laziness on my part? After reading Hila’s post, I checked the pattern (Vogue 8750) and my posts. 😳

Then I saw an article in Threads magazine (not online), but I had a copy.

Vogue got it wrong. They clearly state grosgrain, and it should be Petersham ribbon.

I’m considering it intuition.

😄

(a.k.a. luck – hehe!)