Tag Archives: holidays

happy mothering day (u.k.)

❤️ May your today sparkle ❤️

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❤️ ❤️ Happy Valentine’s Day! ❤️ ❤️

❤️ ❤️ ❤️ Hope all you LovelyReaders have a wonderful day today ❤️ ❤️ ❤️

This is another remnant from my Chicago fabric collection. It was found at Vogue Fabrics and added shortly after what’s now my recent skirt.

I’m leaving the piccies huge so you can see the details. I think that embroidery is upside down. Just realised the embroidered shape, if it were more pronounced, might be a bit of a prob, or am I being paranoid?

This is one yard of medium weight unknown fibre, 60 inches wide with 30% stretch.

Never considered it for anything except a bottom something er other, due to weight and inside texture. (I hate having to line things. Much easier to make a slip.)

Which I’ve been planning on doing with both these pieces (below).

And delving amidst the collection, thinking about slips and such, these two pieces of rayon came to mind. After searching for threads, came up with some make-do’s.

computer’s ba-a-ack . . .

 

real wellies & woolies day outside

. . .  faster and 500 gigs fatter than the old hard drive. He-he! Whilst that tablet left me cursing more than once, it was adequate for keeping in touch and it also uncovered some surprises.

The sensitive touch screen was danged uncomfortable to get used to, but what felt like forever was actually more like three days.

Appropriate apps were quickly downloaded once I discovered how truly bad the pre-programmed search engine was.  (And pop-up ads were conquered, too.)

Using the tablet I read a couple of my favourite Mrs. Malory books unavailable except in on-line editions. Delightful bedtime reads. (Shh! Rumor has it Santa  pre-ordered another favourite: Mrs. Tim Gets a Job by D.E. Stevenson.) I still prefer books to electronics, but needs must when availability (and price!) are concerned.

Friend Scott out in San Francisco has been working with Dean Street Press  getting a lot of out-of-print authors back into print, and this is one of the newest batch from his Furrowed Middlebrow (FM) series. Amazon US                      Amazon UK

I’ve read all of F.M.’s  Frances Faviell books, and enjoyed them tremendously. One of the delightful things about Scott’s series is they’ve all had half a chapter or so on Amazon to download for free, so you can get a sense of the writing before buying. Most helpful ~ wish more companies would do this.

cannot for the life of me remember why there’s a whole packet of this colour in stash… not one of my ‘usual’ shades!

What else has been going on besides watching late election returns and reading? The normal seasonal clothing swap, with associated mendings, such as those leftovers from late last winter’s tops I’d chosen not to hem. They’re now sorted, and I’ve moved on to some RTW slightly short old cords. Plus thinking more urgently about several pieces of winter fabric and how to make them up.  Photos soon.

Slowly some projects are making their way through the thinking stages, and they’re a mix of hot and cold weather items. Am I the only one doing this? The climate down here can be 60’s one day and 40’s two days later.

Sometimes I’ll put on a video while seam ripping, and lately I’ve revisited that dapper gent Lord Peter Wimsey. Ages ago when the series came out in the U.S.  National Public Radio wrote, “They offer us a fantasy of perfect closure, a world where even bloody murder is little more than a brainteaser that can, and will, be solved.” If there’s ever a time for whimsy, it’s whilst seam ripping.

I might have finally cracked my crater bread problem, partly by accident. I was rereading the booklet that came with the machine and realised they’d specified one type of yeast at the beginning, when describing ingredients in general.

But the specific recipes didn’t specify that same yeast. I had been using regular yeast. Wrong. Seems I needed rapid rise for bread maker bread.  I checked with King Arthur’s web site,  my on-line bread experts.

proper bread — at last! ! !

Yep. The change was made. And not too much change resulted in my next loaf. Oops?

Then one weekend I forgot to stop the machine and remove the paddle before the bread started the final rise. That loaf was perfect.

Cutting out the paddle from the centre bottom wasn’t too difficult. The loaf sliced beautifully, and the crumb was more consistent and lighter. Maybe I should give the King Arthur yeast a try, too.

Meanwhile, today looks more like rainy Yorkshire than a southern state (no disrespect meant to Yorkshire as I love such days), but I’ve no fireplace to sit in front of and knit or crochet. Maybe I’ll sort out the un-moldy blackberries and stir up some muffins.  But the library’s open after the hol. Maybe I’ll venture forth and see what’s on the shelf . . .

Lovelies,

May your horizons be even more bountiful!

Forgive me, couldn’t resist adding one of my favourites.

😉

thanksgiving

Letter From New York by Helene Hanff, author of 84, Charing Cross Road

For once it has been decently cool down here in the southern portions, and actually feels like Autumn.

And thus, after a hectic beginning of the month, we’ve progressed to the fourth Thursday of November which is traditionally Thanksgiving here in America.

My thoughts have gone to Helene Hanff’s description of the holiday as written for the BBC Women’s Hour audience of 1978, and kept for us to enjoy in her 1992 volume, Letters From New York, BBC Women’s Hour Broadcasts.

November, 1978 . . .

“Before the days of James the First, a group of English farmers disagreed with the Church of England. “They will conform,” said King James, “or I will harry them out of the kingdom.” They didn’t conform, and he harried them out… They got on a ship called the Mayflower and sailed to the New World, and landed at Plymouth, Massachusetts, and established a colony. And since they called themselves “pilgrims” they became known to American history as the Pilgrim Fathers…

“What happened was: the Pilgrims were befriended by the native Americans—the Indians—who taught them how to fertilize the land with eels, how to grow Indian corn and eat it off the cob,

New York City’s finest (Ceremonial division) in the parade rather than walking the beat. Rest assured there were plenty on duty amongst the crowds. I get misty over these guys because 9/11 always comes to mind.

and how to cook and eat an American bird called a turkey. And the next autumn, when the Pilgrims reaped a bountiful harvest, they invited the Indians to a feast where everybody gave thanks to God for the harvest. That feast was the first American Thanksgiving…

“What makes New York’s Thanksgiving unique is the Macy Parade, which has been hauling parents out of bed on Thanksgiving Day for fifty-five years.

(Note: Today is the 92nd parade.)

“The parade features helium-filled balloon likenesses of cartoon characters each as tall as a six- or seven-story building.

(Note: In between the balloons are high school bands and flag wavers and floats from across the country. There was a balloon missing, but as it was windy and below freezing, perhaps they decided a Florida golf course was a better place for someone in a diaper. 😉)

“Americans across the country are determined to get home for Thanksgiving, our quintessential family holiday, more so even than Christmas, since it embraces all religions and recalls the Dissenters’ faith on which this country was founded.”

His Good Self (Santa) always ends the parade at high noon. (The snow was fake, but the 26℉ wasn’t.)

Hope everyone, everywhere, is giving thanks for this day, and enjoying it.

                           🍂 🦃 🦃 🦃 🍂