Tag Archives: books

little books

very late Thursday night…

Today marks two little books coming into yours truly’s purview.

The lovely little one (left) is full of positiveness and support — things we in the sewing community hold dear, and which author Karen Ball (Did You Make That) has in abundance.

(Added: Click the book to go to amazon U.K. to order. This is mailed to other countries; the download Kindle oversion is not available in America. Don’t know about other countries. Sorry. ☹️)

The other book isn’t small. A large dark chocolate egg might help. I suspect the first book will be an antidote for the second. Meanwhile . . . . ✂️ ✂️ ✂️

Patterns are cut out, fabric awaits, and the holiday weekend is upon us. Time to crack on! 🤣 🤣 🐣 🐥 🐣 🤣 🤣

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rayon, rayon everywhere (aka, viscose)

Last week I was musing over this Butterick pattern, B5655. I got it out to confirm there are two complete items here, a dress or tunic and duster, sewn together. Both duster and dress use separate front and back pattern pieces.

For me, on a very hot and humid summer day, this is a big deal. If/when I make this up I’ve a feeling there won’t be double layers both front and back. If there are, they will not be sewn together, and one – probably the duster – will have longish and loose sleeves. 😉

Also under scrutiny last week was this cocoon dress from Vogue, V1496. Whilst talking with Vogue Fabrics to locate elastic lace for those half slips, I saw an interesting rayon/viscose fabric that might work well for this Vogue dress. Eager to have it in my hot little hands, I hoped it would arrive on the weekend. It didn’t. 😟

Wednesday the package appeared. I like the fabric very much. It’s very light in weight but not transparent, and it washed and dried in cool temps with nary a wrinkle. However, this is a fuzzy fabric. Fuzzy does not feel good in heat and humidity.

So I’m back to the planning stage for this fabric. But as you see below, there are some interesting color combinations in the offing. More thinking . . . which at some point makes my brain begin to feel a bit like Pooh’s, but we’ll get to that later.

About those other fabrics – The solid teal rayon (left) I’ve planned for trousers; the green and black pattern (another rayon) is already both blouse and skirt. The dark brick, right, (rayon again – are we noticing a trend?) was earmarked for a half slip, and the cinnamony arrows (cotton lawn) is a dead match for those tiny butterflies… another blouse?

I’m thinking the fuzzy rayon might make a blouse that can also be worn as a second layer atop another blouse, leaving the solid teal for trousers, and do the arrows cotton lawn as another blouse.

What do you think? Have I totally lost you? 🤪

books

It’s been a while, but you know I haven’t stopped reading! The local town library has opened again after renovations, so I collected a little pile… and just finished Becoming (Michelle Obama), loaned graciously by Jen of Let the Sewing Begin after I mentioned there were over 1,000 on the waiting list.

It was an absorbing book for two reasons: First, it is extremely well written and paced, and is very conversational in style. Secondly, it felt personal. I was living in Chicago and walked home from a late work session the night of Obama’s first election and could easily hear the crowd’s roar a couple of blocks over in Grant Park. The whole city felt lite up that night, proud and honored that one of our own was going to the White House.

The night of Obama’s re-election I could hear the crowds over on Michigan Avenue roaring every time cars flew past, hoping it was Obama on the way from his home, south of me, up to his campaign headquarters further north.

On the weekend I listened almost non-stop to the audio version of The Music Shop because the first paragraph grabbed me and I couldn’t stop listening. At two in the morning, exhaustion demanded a pause for sleep.

No, I never read the whole Winnie the Pooh and thought it was time. The stories are well suited for any age reader. The contrast between them and headlines is a stark but needed reminder of what I prefer to consider normal: gentleness, kindness, consideration, and lots of humor.

The unreadable title underneath it is Sayers’ Strong Poison. Haven’t started this one yet… And I couldn’t resist picking up Clinton Kelly’s book, Oh No She Didn’t, for a quick review of What Not to Wear. Remember that program?

Crochet One-Skein Wonders is interesting to look through but I’m not planning anything from it just now. It’s just because it was there and I thought it would be interesting to look through. (We’ll have to wait and see how that works out. 😉)

Yikes! This is marathony! Best stop, say many, maaany thanks to anyone still reading, and wish everyone . . .

May your sewing machine always be oiled, your needle sharp, and your bobbin full!

tuesday

Have been working on a rogue skirt on the weekend, a remnant I picked up whilst living in Chicago because I couldn’t resist the feel. Although 54″ wide, there’s only enough for a gathered skirt.

Imagine a buttery soft rayon twill with a perfect amount of weight, and such intriguing colours and pattern. Heavenly! And it doesn’t wrinkle easily.

The skirt is mid-calf, no pockets or zip, elasticated waist and will be ever so delicious to wear! Another possible match with that batik duster?

books

Haven’t been including any books, although I’ve been thoroughly enjoying the three Mrs. Tim books re-released earlier this month by Scott’s Furrowed Middlebrow subset of Dean Street Press.

Finished all three and cannot say enough how totally enjoyable they are. As Alexander McCall Smith wrote in his introduction,

“One of the main features of Stevenson’s novels is their simplicity. That is a quality that is not rated in fiction today. Many writers now feel that in order to be noticed they must go out of their way to be clever –even to the extent of being opaque. Nothing should be portrayed as it seems to be; cynicism is all; sincerity is hopelessly naïve. In such a climate, direct stories that follow a fairly strict chronological pattern, that eschew obfuscation, and that place feasible and, in many cases, rather likeable characters centre-stage are not highly regarded. And yet that is exactly what Stevenson does, and that is what many readers still seem to want. Add humour to the equation and the mixture will find a ready audience…

“These are gentle books, very fitting for times of uncertainty and conflict. Some books can be prescribed for anxiety – these are in that category. And it is an honourable and important one.”

Am also wending my way through the short stories in Silent Night, edited by Martin Edwards. Was very impressed with the Sayers short story, and will at some point reread her Wimsey books.

The mystery crochet project has run out of yarn, so a squidgy package has been ordered. Goodies from across the pond – yeah!

On that good thought, will wish you Lovely Readers happy sewing!

reflection in a puddle

This has been the wettest year in my area since . . . ever.

The wet stuff is still falling, and projected to do so into January.

At least it isn’t s**w. 😳

I’ve been reading a “new” British author, almost unknown these days: Annie Haynes. She and Agatha Christie were the only two women authors published by The Bodley Head, a noted early Golden Age publisher. Unfortunately, Haynes died young and her books went out of print.

I’ve downloaded four of them, the Inspector Stoddard series, from Dean Street Press. At 99 cents each they are a welcome bargain.

Just finished the third, Who Killed Charmian Karslake? and am enjoying them. I guessed the murderer in the first book (The Man With the Dark Beard) but have been clueless reading the others. More info is here.

Meanwhile, have a yard of knitted scarf in that autumnal yarn and have decided it is not what I want. Will wait a bit more before deciding whether to rip it all out and start something else. . .

Seems almost wasteful to continue, yet almost foolish to frog all that knitting. Any thoughts, Lovely Readers? 🤪 Continue reading reflection in a puddle