let’s talk fit (or, Lagenlook 2)

OK.
Getting serious about this Vogue 8813 pattern ~
How the heck is it gonna fit?

Here are some of the things I’ve been thinking about.
Hope you’ll grab a cuppa and come along!

considering – fit
I keep remembering Gale Grigg Hazen’s book, Fantastic Fit for Every Body. Don’t know about you, but I’m not flat as a pancake. This book shows how to make & use a 3-dimensional croquis. And might be something I need to think about a bit more with this Lagenlook pattern.

Moving on . . .

considering – proportion
Trolled back in me memory banks and ” bulging columns” came to mind, and something about that being a better proportion to the eye. That roused my curiosity (I’ve got bulges), and I went further. After all, a body is like a column and we want the best-looking one we can get – right?!

According to Wikipedia, ancient Greek architectural principles “gave … a sense of proportion, culminating in understanding the proportions of the greatest work of art: the human body…”

And . . .

Columns, again from Wiki: “The design of most classical columns incorporates entasis (the inclusion of a slight outward curve in the sides) plus a reduction in diameter along the height of the column, so that the top is as little as 83% of the bottom diameter. This reduction mimics the parallax effects which the eye expects to see, and tends to make columns look taller and straighter than they are while entasis adds to that effect.”

  • “Outward curve in the sides” could be applied to a body
  • Having a slightly smaller top than bottom could be accomplished, with hair-do, or a tunic
  • Might beef up a base with boots or leggings

There are three basic kinds of columns, and Corinthian might be most applicable to clothing: “the most ornate of the orders, characterized by fluted columns… ”

A-ha! Use gathers or pleats from top to bottom to elongate the body line.

And that reminded me of Fortuny’s Delphos dresses, so . . . .

Below are three examples.
Click any to go to its source
And ask yourself ~

  • Does the wearer look good?
  • What’s the wearer’s actual body type?
  • What makes the dress look good?
“Mariano Fortuny (1871-1949), Silk Pleated “Delphos” Gown in Champagne with Murano Glass Beadwork, c. 1910, Venice Italy, Estimate $4,000-5,000”

“Mariano Fortuny (1871-1949), Silk Pleated “Delphos” Gown in Champagne with Murano Glass Beadwork, c. 1910, Venice Italy, Estimate $4,000-5,000”

 

Breaking all those rules? Hmmm – maybe that extra fabric at the base gives it more weight.
Do I like that cinched waist? Not for me! But somehow everything does work . . . do like that shoulder effect  . . .

 

"Mrs. Condé Nast wearing one of the famous Fortuny tea gowns. This one has no tunic but is finely pleated, in the Fortuny manner, and falls in long lines, closely following the figure, to the floor."

“Mrs. Condé Nast wearing one of the famous Fortuny tea gowns. This one has no tunic but is finely pleated, in the Fortuny manner, and falls in long lines, closely following the figure, to the floor.”

 

If this “has no tunic” then what’s that darker fabric on either side of the torso?
Whatever it is, I think it helps the overall effect. . .
Real rounded tummy certainly there . . . smaller top . . .

 

“Delphos dress and evening jacket, Mariano Fortuny, about 1920. Museum no. T.423-1976 & T.424-1976”

“Delphos dress and evening jacket, Mariano Fortuny, about 1920. Museum no. T.423-1976 & T.424-1976”

 D-R-A-M-A-T-I-C !
Don’t notice body shape, pleats, much detail except the dramatic deep red against the black.
Overall line, from shoulder to bottom tip of dress does move outward , , ,
Architectural shapes in middle are interesting – could be a good camouflage?

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2 thoughts on “let’s talk fit (or, Lagenlook 2)

    1. CurlsnSkirls Post author

      Thank you ~ am so sorry I don’t recall where the concept originated, as it’s not from me. Just thought it appropriate & passed it along!

      Reply

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