curtains

Today I finally buckled down and sewed up a pair of curtains that the large lounge window’s been needing. I cheated. I only used lining fabric.  Since I know I’ll not be here long, am sticking with what I brought from my previous windows. It’s all the same blackout fabric.

What’s that, you ask? Ah-ha!  Blackout fabric is a way to keep 100% of the light out of a room, and insulate from temperature and noise in the bargain. And it is white (but I’ve seen cream, too).

These days we need all the insulation we can get!

There are a few things to remember when working with this fabric.  As you can see at the top, once you’ve made a seam, it stays because the fabric is punctured. If you’re using this as lining, that might not be a big deal. It isn’t for me just now. On the other hand, it you’re looking for a different effect, this could be terrific!

Another thing you don’t have to worry about is fraying. Although I did use pinking shears, it was only because I felt like it.  🙂 As you see, I also did a teeny tiny shirttail hem.  Made me feel better before I slapped them up on the windows.

This is a heavy fabric. I used a denim needle and lengthened my stitch 1 mm or so, with regular poly thread, which I’ve always used.

Most home dec fabric shops should have this, which runs about $8 a yard, USD, at 54″ wide. I’ve always washed it in cold water & dried in low heat. After a few years, it may start slight fraying on the selveges, and the lining may start to crack, but it’s minor.  And besides, nothing lasts forever.

Except this heat wave.

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