Feeding One’s Soul, Mae West, & Dudamel

Why is it so difficult to feed one’s soul?  Julia Cameron speaks about this extremely important point at great length and makes it a weekly must in her book, The Artist’s Way.

Stick with your nose to the grindstone and never look up.  Where’s the inspiration in that?, she points out. Sounds more like martyrdom, and it’s self-martyrdom because it’s self-induced.

It’s bad enough the rest of the world constantly throws dirt into whatever art you pursue.  Don’t do it to yourselves!  And for heaven’s sake, get away from anyone who does it to you!  A toxic attitude will block or murder one’s positive impulses.

Consider Mae West.  In her 1935 movie Goin’ to Town, she astounds the viewer by singing the end of Mon coeur s’ouvre a ta voix( from Samson & Dalilah) “in delectable French” with tenor Vladimir Bykoff.  Mae West and opera??

The lady had class.  She had style.  She also knew exactly what she was doing as actor/writer/director/producer on Broadway and Hollywood.

To watch her fingering locks of Samson’s long curly wig while singing is priceless. So are her warmup arpeggios.

Many people feel the arts should and can uplift the human race, as in “music hath charms to sooth the savage breast.”  I think there’s a great deal to be said in that sense.

Did you know that an entire country in South America has embraced classical orchestra training as the way to lift their country’s economy, and they’ve been at it for 30-odd years?   How’s it working out?

60 Minutes did a review lately and thought things were going just swell.  A rising star of the program, Gustavo Dudamel,  just got hired by the L.A. Phil.  He’s a product of that program.

CLASSICAL music, as in strings and harps and stuff?  Yes!  It’s amazing to see the footage of the poverty in South American city slums, then see and hear classical music everywhere in those slums.   It changes the people.

Why?  How?

It lifts people up.  Above where they are.  To a higher level.  It gives them dreams, and discipline to reach them.  Then they’re no longer in the slums.

When mental self-image changes, the physical environment can change, too. Ms. West knew that decades ago.