let’s talk fit (or, Lagenlook II)

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let’s talk fit (or, Lagenlook II)

OK.
Getting serious about this Vogue 8813 pattern ~
How the heck is it gonna fit?

Here are some of the things I’ve been thinking about.
Hope you’ll grab a cuppa and come along!

considering – fit
I keep remembering Gale Grigg Hazen’s book, Fantastic Fit for Every Body. Don’t know about you, but I’m not flat as a pancake. This book shows how to make & use a 3-dimensional croquis. And might be something I need to think about a bit more with this Lagenlook pattern.

Moving on . . .

considering – proportion
Trolled back in me memory banks and ” bulging columns” came to mind, and something about that being a better proportion to the eye. That roused my curiosity (I’ve got bulges), and I went further. After all, a body is like a column and we want the best-looking one we can get – right?!

According to Wikipedia, ancient Greek architectural principles “gave … a sense of proportion, culminating in understanding the proportions of the greatest work of art: the human body…”

And . . .

Columns, again from Wiki: “The design of most classical columns incorporates entasis (the inclusion of a slight outward curve in the sides) plus a reduction in diameter along the height of the column, so that the top is as little as 83% of the bottom diameter. This reduction mimics the parallax effects which the eye expects to see, and tends to make columns look taller and straighter than they are while entasis adds to that effect.”

  • “Outward curve in the sides” could be applied to a body
  • Having a slightly smaller top than bottom could be accomplished, with hair-do, or a tunic
  • Might beef up a base with boots or leggings

There are three basic kinds of columns, and Corinthian might be most applicable to clothing: “the most ornate of the orders, characterized by fluted columns… ”

A-ha! Use gathers or pleats from top to bottom to elongate the body line.

And that reminded me of Fortuny’s Delphos dresses, so . . . .

Below are three examples.
Click any to go to its source
And ask yourself ~

  • Does the wearer look good?
  • What’s the wearer’s actual body type?
  • What makes the dress look good?
“Mariano Fortuny (1871-1949), Silk Pleated “Delphos” Gown in Champagne with Murano Glass Beadwork, c. 1910, Venice Italy, Estimate $4,000-5,000”

“Mariano Fortuny (1871-1949), Silk Pleated “Delphos” Gown in Champagne with Murano Glass Beadwork, c. 1910, Venice Italy, Estimate $4,000-5,000”

 

Breaking all those rules? Hmmm – maybe that extra fabric at the base gives it more weight.
Do I like that cinched waist? Not for me! But somehow everything does work . . . do like that shoulder effect  . . .

 

"Mrs. Condé Nast wearing one of the famous Fortuny tea gowns. This one has no tunic but is finely pleated, in the Fortuny manner, and falls in long lines, closely following the figure, to the floor."

“Mrs. Condé Nast wearing one of the famous Fortuny tea gowns. This one has no tunic but is finely pleated, in the Fortuny manner, and falls in long lines, closely following the figure, to the floor.”

 

If this “has no tunic” then what’s that darker fabric on either side of the torso?
Whatever it is, I think it helps the overall effect. . .
Real rounded tummy certainly there . . . smaller top . . .

 

“Delphos dress and evening jacket, Mariano Fortuny, about 1920. Museum no. T.423-1976 & T.424-1976”

“Delphos dress and evening jacket, Mariano Fortuny, about 1920. Museum no. T.423-1976 & T.424-1976”

 D-R-A-M-A-T-I-C !
Don’t notice body shape, pleats, much detail except the dramatic deep red against the black.
Overall line, from shoulder to bottom tip of dress does move outward , , ,
Architectural shapes in middle are interesting – could be a good camouflage?

Lagenlook I: what’s that?

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Lagenlook I: what’s that?

Lagenlook refers to a layered style in clothing, and appears to be credited with appearing in the 1970’s.

I saw the term about a week ago. Then I went on-line and started educating my eye & intellect. Then I spent time thinking.

initial analysis
Since the 1990’s I’ve favoured a summer outfit topped with either a blouse or a long jacket. I still have two jackets from that period, each of which I’ve worn and been complimented on this summer.

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this week, close up

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this week, close up

Have been working on this post for several days, lacking a title. It’s a close-up look at the various threads (pun intended) of the extra-curricula workings of a creative person.

Lest anyone think applying line, pattern, texture, function & design to clothing a foolish pastime, consider some of the technical (engineering) challenges involved in putting them all together successfully in a 3-dimensional garment that’s made from the inside out, must withstand movement and frequent cleaning, and reflect the personality of the owner/wearer.

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half & half skirt

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half & half skirt

Half, a. [AS. healf]  …️ a half view.

First, a quick view of my new table, which i don’t know if I like yet, as the top is black and things can get “lost” on it. Of course, the saving graces include drawers, where I can stash a lot of sewing toys & trinkets, plus I can always spray paint that top another colour, right?

 

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sewing again!

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sewing again!

VOGUE 8750

Making the green skirt,

middle right.

Answering a 2012 post, Kerri wrote: “. . .  I’ll be interested to see how it fits when you’re finished.”

With my apologies, I’m finally getting back to you, Kerri!

click to go to enlarged photos & captions, and places to comment on a photo

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symbols of independence

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symbols of independence

SYM”BOL, n. [L. symbolum; Gr. with, and to throw; to compare.] … An emblem or representation of something else.

i remember how thrilled i was to purchase this used machine years ago ~ it gave me the freedom to sew knit fabrics & rolled hem edges & it was sheer bliss!

i remember how thrilled i was to purchase this used machine years ago ~ it gave me the freedom to sew knit fabrics & rolled hem edges & it was sheer bliss!

 

 

 

detail feet

additional feet give me more flexibility in what can be accomplished with less effort… when i learn how to use ’em!

ad

this vintage ad is reprinted inside my early 20th century book of pattern instructions by Mary Brooks Picken.

 

another great tool for independence ~ and understanding more about how your machine(s) function! used it on my former machine & saved $ on trips to the repair shop!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

More on Mary Brooks Picken’s The One Hour Dress booklet here.

 

WordPress Weekly Challenge

Ailsa’s travel theme, independence

 

 

improvements & a useful tool

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improvements & a useful tool

Have been washing and filing fabrics again this weekend, as well as digging out more of that chaotic pile and putting it in order.

As part of straightening out I’ve finally gotten a little mirror hung in my closet, to check how jewellery looks with my outfit without having to walk across the room to the door, (and away from the jewellery). No, I’m not being (too) lazy!

Sometimes that distance makes for a lot of to-ing and fro-ing, when a combination just won’t come right. I’m grateful to have it resolved.

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